Dance To The Music Of Time Volume 3 books by Anthony Powell

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Anthony Powell Dance To The Music Of Time Volume 3

PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC Dance To The Music Of Time Volume 3 books Volume 3 contains novels seven to nine of the Dance To The Music Of Time sequence.Anthony Powell's brilliant twelve-novel sequence chronicles the lives of over three hundred characters, and is a unique evocation of life in twentieth-century England. It is unrivalled for its scope, its humour and the enormous pleasure it has given to generations.In this volume, containing books seven to nine of the sequence, Powell follows Nicholas Jenkins and a host of familar and newer characters through the strains, absurdities and preoccupations of England at war.

A Question of Upbringing

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A Buyer's Market

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The Acceptance World

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At Lady Molly's

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Books Do Furnish a Room

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Casanova's Chinese Restaurant

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The Kindly Ones

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The Valley of Bones

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The Military Philosophers

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The Soldier's Art

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Hearing Secret Harmonies

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Temporary Kings

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Afternoon Men

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How to turn your pain into power

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What's Become of Waring

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The Fisher King

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Venusberg

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O, How the Wheel Becomes It!

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O, How the Wheel Becomes It!, Afternoon Men, At Lady Molly's, The Fisher King, Casanova's Chinese Restaurant, What's Become of Waring, The Acceptance World, A Question of Upbringing, Books Do Furnish a Room, Venusberg, How to turn your pain into power, A Buyer's Market, Hearing Secret Harmonies, The Soldier's Art, The Kindly Ones, Temporary Kings, The Military Philosophers, The Valley of Bones

A Question of Upbringing

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.


A Question of Upbringing (1951) introduces us to the young Nick Jenkins and his housemates at boarding school in the years just after World War I. Boyhood pranks and visits from relatives bring to life the amusements and longueurs of schooldays even as they reveal characters and traits that will follow Jenkins and his friends through adolescence and beyond: Peter Templer, a rich, passionate womanizer; Charles Stringham, aristocratic and louche; and Kenneth Widmerpool, awkward and unhappy, yet strikingly ambitious. By the end of the novel, Jenkins has finished university and is setting out on a life in London; old ties are fraying, new ones are forming, and the first steps of the dance are well underway.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”—Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”—Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times


“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”—Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”—Kingsley Amis

“There is no other work in the annals of European fiction that attempts meticulously to recreate half a century of history, decade by decade, with anything like the emotional precision or details of Powell’s twelve volumes. Neither Balzac’s panorama of the Restoration, nor Zola’s chronicles of the Second Empire, nor Proust’s reveries in the Belle Epoque can match a comparable span of time, an attention to variations within it, or a compositional intricacy capable of uniting them into a single narrative. . . . The elegance of this artifice was only compatible with comedy.”—Perry Anderson

A Buyer's Market

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

The second volume, A Buyer’s Market (1952),finds young Nick Jenkins struggling to establish himself in London. Amid the fever of the 1920s, he attends formal dinners and wild parties; makes his first tentative forays into the worlds of art, culture, and bohemian life; and suffers his first disappointments in love. Old friends come and go, but the paths they once shared are rapidly diverging: Stringham is settling into a life of debauchery and drink, Templer is plunging into the world of business, and Widmerpool, though still a figure of out-of-place grotesquerie, remains unbowed, confident in his own importance and eventual success. A Buyer’s Market is a striking portrait of the pleasures and anxieties of early adulthood, set against a backdrop of London life and culture at one of its most effervescent moments.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

The Acceptance World

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London . Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

The third volume, The Acceptance World (1955), opens with Nick Jenkins, in his late twenties, beginning to make his way in the world of letters: working for a publisher, writing on his own, and establishing connections across the literary landscape. At the same time, he is making his way in love, as a surprise meeting with an old friend’s sister blossoms into an affair. Meanwhile, friends are diving into marriage and careers, and the patterns of life’s dance are starting to take shape—even as the future steps remain shadowy.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune


“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times


“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker


“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

At Lady Molly's

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

As the fourth book, At Lady Molly’s (1957), opens, the heady pleasures of the 1920s have begun to give way to the austerity and worries of the 1930s. Even so, the whirl of London life continues: friends commit to causes and to spouses, confess adulteries, and fall victim to dissipation and disillusion. As Nick moves ever more comfortably in the worlds of art, culture, and society, Powell’s palette broadens: old friends make appearances, but new ones take places on the stage as well—including Isobel Tolland, whom Nick knows at first sight he’s destined to marry.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times


“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

Books Do Furnish a Room

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

The tenth volume, Books Do Furnish a Room (1971), finds Nick Jenkins and his circle beginning to re-establish their lives and careers in the wake of the war. Nick dives into work on a study of Robert Burton; Widmerpool grapples with the increasingly difficult and cruel Pamela Flitton—now his wife; and we are introduced to the series’ next great character, the dissolute Bohemian novelist X. Trapnel, a man who exudes in equal measure mystery, talent, and an air of self-destruction.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker


“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

Casanova's Chinese Restaurant

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.



Casanova’s Chinese Restaurant
(1960), the fifth book, finds Nick marrying Isobel Tolland and launching happily into family life—including his new role as brother-in-law to Isobel’s many idiosyncratic siblings. But even as Nick’s life is settling down, those of his friends are full of drama and heartache: his best friend, Hugh Moreland, is risking his marriage on a hopeless affair, while Charles Stringham has nearly destroyed himself with drink. Full of Powell’s typically sharp observations about life and love, Casanova’s Chinese Restaurant offers all the rewards and frustrations, pleasures and regrets of one’s thirties.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”—Chicago Tribune


“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”—Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”—Naomi Bliven, New Yorker 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”—Kingsley Amis

The Kindly Ones

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

As volume six, The Kindly Ones (1962), opens, rumblings from Germany recall memories of Nick Jenkins’s boyhood and his father’s service in World War I; it seems clear that all too soon, uniforms will be back in fashion. The looming threat throws the ordinary doings of life into stark relief, as Nick and his friends continue to negotiate the pitfalls of adult life. Moreland’s marriage founders, Peter Templer’s wife—his second—is clearly going mad, and Widmerpool is, disturbingly, gaining prominence in the business world even as he angles for power in the coming conflict. War, with all its deaths and disruptions, is on the way. 

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

The Valley of Bones

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

World War II has finally broken out, and The Valley of Bones (1964) finds Nick Jenkins learning the military arts. A stint at a training academy in Wales introduces him to the many unusual characters the army has thrown together, from the ambitious bank clerk-turned-martinet, Gwatkin, to the hopelessly slovenly yet endearing washout, Bithel. Even during wartime, however, domestic life proceeds, as a pregnant Isobel nears her term and her siblings’ romantic lives take unexpected turns—their affairs of the heart lent additional urgency by the ever-darkening shadow of war.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker


“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

The Military Philosophers

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.

The ninth volume, The Military Philosophers (1968), takes the series through the end of the war. Nick has found a place, reasonably tolerable by army standards, as an assistant liaison with foreign governments in exile. But like the rest of his countrymen, he is weary of life in uniform and looking ahead to peacetime. Until then, however, the fortunes of war continue to be unpredictable: more names are cruelly added to the bill of mortality, while other old friends and foes prosper. Widmerpool becomes dangerously entranced by the beautiful, fascinating, and vicious Pamela Flitton; and Nick’s old flame Jean Duport makes a surprising reappearance. Elegiac and moving, but never without wit and perception, this volume wraps up Powell’s unsurpassed treatment of England’s finest yet most costly hour.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

The Soldier's Art

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.


The eighth volume, The Soldier’s Art (1966), finds Nick in the thankless position of assistant to a rapidly rising Major Widmerpool. The disruptions of war throw up other familiar faces as well: Charles Stringham, heroically emerging from alcoholism but a mere shadow of his former self; Hugh Moreland, his marriage broken, himself nearly so. As the Blitz intensifies, the war’s toll mounts; the fates are claiming their own, and many friends will not be seen again. 

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

Hearing Secret Harmonies

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.


In the final volume, Hearing Secret Harmonies, Nick and his contemporaries have begun to settle into the quieter stages of later life—even as the rise of the counterculture signals that a new generation is pushing its way to the front. The darkly fascinating young Scorpio Murtlock unexpectedly draws Widmerpool into his orbit, calling to mind occult and cultish doings from earlier decades; close friends leave the stage, never to be replaced in this life; and, drawing all the long, tangled strands together, Anthony Powell sounds an unforgettable requiem for an age.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

Temporary Kings

Anthony PowellAnthony Powell’s universally acclaimed epic A Dance to the Music of Time offers a matchless panorama of twentieth-century London. Now, for the first time in decades, readers in the United States can read the books of Dance as they were originally published—as twelve individual novels—but with a twenty-first-century twist: they’re available only as e-books.


In this penultimate volume, Temporary Kings (1973), Nick and his contemporaries are at the height of their various careers in the arts, business, and politics. X. Trapnel is dead, but his mystery continues to draw ghoulish interest from readers and academics alike—as well as from his lover, Pamela Widmerpool. Kenneth Widmerpool, meanwhile, is an MP with mysterious connections beyond the newly dropped Iron Curtain, but he continues to be tormented by Pamela; a spectacular explosion, Nick can’t help but realize, is imminent.

“Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician.”--Chicago Tribune

“A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell’s world is as large and as complex as Proust’s.”--Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times

“One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience.”--Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

 

“The most brilliant and penetrating novelist we have.”--Kingsley Amis

Afternoon Men

Anthony PowellWritten from a vantage point both high and deliberately narrow, the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and the strange drivers of human behavior.

More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, Powell’s early works reveal the stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in his epic, A Dance to the Music of Time.

In Afternoon Men, the earliest and perhaps most acid of Powell’s novels, we meet the museum clerk William Atwater, a young man stymied in both his professional and romantic endeavors. Immersed in Atwater’s coterie of acquaintances—a similarly unsatisfied cast of rootless, cocktail-swilling London sophisticates—we learn of the conflict between his humdrum work life and louche social scene, of his unrequited love, and, during a trip to the country, of the absurd contrivances of proper manners.

A satire that verges on nihilism and a story touched with sexism and equal doses self-loathing and self-medication, AfternoonMen has a grim edge to it. But its dialogue sparks and its scenes grip, and for aficionados of Powell, this first installment in his literary canon will be a welcome window onto the mind of a great artist learning his craft.

How to turn your pain into power

Anthony PowellAll in life is about perception and the way you look at things.  

These may change if you change your mindset and doing things differently. 

You will learn how to turn around the situations that are holding you back

What's Become of Waring

Anthony PowellUnsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powell’s epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

In What’s Become of Waring, Powell lampoons a world with which he was intimately acquainted: the inner workings of a small London publisher. But even as Powell eviscerates the publishers’ less than scrupulous plotting in his tale of wild coincidences, mistaken identity, and romance, he never strays to the far side of farce. 

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powell’s early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powell’s work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

The Fisher King

Anthony PowellAboard the Alecto, prolific romance author Valentine Beals ruminates on the ship’s most seemingly incongruous couple: a graceful, ethereal, virginal dancer named Barberina Rookwood and her lover, Saul Henchman, a crippled, emasculated war hero and photographer. Fancifully, Beals imagines Henchman to be the reembodiment of one of the most mysterious Arthurian legends, the Fisher King—the maimed and impotent ruler of a barren country of whom Perceval failed to ask the right questions. A myth with many permutations—and a blurred borderland between them—the Fisher King legend dovetails the various explanations Powell offers from his competing narrators as to why a talented young dancer would forsake her art to care for a feeble older man.

Ostensibly a novel about gossip on a cruise ship, The Fisher King is much more: a highly stylized narrative infused with Greek mythology, legend, and satire.

Venusberg

Anthony PowellWritten from a vantage point both high and deliberately narrow, the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and the strange drivers of human behavior. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, Powell’s early works reveal the stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in his epic, A Dance to the Music of Time.

Powell’s sophomore novel, Venusberg, follows journalist Lushington as he leaves behind his unrequited love in England and travels by boat to an unnamed Baltic state. Awash in a marvelously odd assortment of counts and ladies navigating a multicultural, elegant, and politically precarious social scene, Lushington becomes infatuated with his very own, very foreign Venus. An action-packed literary precursor to Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel, Venusberg is replete with assassins and Nazis, loose countesses and misunderstandings, fatal accidents and social comedy. But beyond its humor, this early installment in Powell’s literary canon will offer readers a welcome window onto the mind of a great artist learning his craft.

O, How the Wheel Becomes It!

Anthony PowellThe first novel Anthony Powell published following the completion of his epic A Dance to the Music of Time, O, How the Wheel Becomes It! fulfills perhaps every author’s fantasy as it skewers a conceited, lazy, and dishonest critic. A writer who avoids serving in World War II and veers in and out of marriage, G. F. H. Shadbold ultimately falls victim to the title’s spinning—and righteous—emblem of chance. Sophisticated and a bit cruel, Wheel’s tale of posthumous vengeance is, nonetheless, irresistible.

Written at the peak of the late British master’s extraordinary literary career, this novel offers profound insight into the mind of a great artist whose unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony will delight devotees and new readers alike.

Agents and Patients

Anthony PowellUnsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powell’s epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

In Agents and Patients, we return to London with the newly wealthy, memorably named Blore-Smith: an innocent, decent enough chap . . . and a drip. Vulnerable to the machinations of those with less money and more lust, Blore-Smith falls victim to two con artists whose ploys carry him through to the art galleries and whorehouses of Paris, Berlin, and beyond.

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powell’s early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powell’s work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

From a View to a Death

Anthony PowellUnsavory artists, titled boobs, and charlatans with an affinity for Freud—such are the oddballs whose antics animate the early novels of the late British master Anthony Powell. A genius of social satire delivered with a very dry wit, Powell builds his comedies on the foibles of British high society between the wars, delving into subjects as various as psychoanalysis, the film industry, publishing, and (of course) sex. More explorations of relationships and vanity than plot-driven narratives, these slim novels reveal the early stirrings of the unequaled style, ear for dialogue, and eye for irony that would reach their caustic peak in Powell’s epic A Dance to the Music of Time.

From a View to a Death takes us to a dilapidated country estate where an ambitious artist of questionable talent, a family of landed aristocrats wondering where the money has gone, and a secretly cross-dressing squire all commingle among the ruins.

Written from a vantage point both high and necessarily narrow, Powell’s early novels nevertheless deal in the universal themes that would become a substantial part of his oeuvre: pride, greed, and what makes people behave as they do. Filled with eccentric characters and piercing insights, Powell’s work is achingly hilarious, human, and true.

Das Tal der Gebeine

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Im siebten Band bildet das Jahr 1940, in dem Churchill Premierminister wird und Italien in den Krieg eintritt, den historischen Hintergrund.

Eine Frage der Erziehung

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
So eröffnet Powell seinen »Tanz« in dem Band »Eine Frage der Erziehung« mit Szenen der Jugend: Jenkins in der Abschlussklasse des College, während eines Sprachaufenthalts in Frankreich sowie beim Five O'Clock Tea seines Universitätsprofessors. Der historische Hintergrund, hier die 1920er Jahre, scheint dabei immer wieder überraschend schlaglichtartig auf.

Tendenz: steigend

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Im zweiten Band sehen wir den Protagonisten auf Bällen und Partys der Oberklasse, aber auch der Boheme, wo er neue und immer wieder alte Bekannte trifft — sowie erste Liebschaften erlebt.

Bei Lady Molly

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Im vierten Band besucht der Erzähler während eines Wochenendaufenthalts ein Schloss, wo er seine zukünftige Frau kennenlernt. Der historische Hintergrund scheint dabei immer wieder überraschend schlaglichtartig auf.

Die Welt des Wechsels

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Geheimnisvolle spiritistische Sitzungen und Dinnerpartys kennzeichnen den dritten Band. Der historische Hintergrund scheint dabei immer wieder überraschend schlaglichtartig auf.

Casanovas chinesisches Restaurant

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Der historische Hintergrund — im fünften Band ist es der Spanische Bürgerkrieg ab 1936 — scheint dabei immer wieder überraschend schlaglichtartig auf.

Die Wohlwollenden

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Im sechsten Band bildet der Vorabend des Zweiten Weltkriegs den historischen Hintergrund, die Zeit also zwischen Münchner Abkommen und Hitler-Stalin-Pakt.

Die Kunst des Soldaten

Anthony PowellDer zwölfbändige Zyklus »Ein Tanz zur Musik der Zeit« —­ aufgrund­ seiner inhaltlichen­ wie formalen Gestaltung immer wieder mit Mar­cel Prousts »Auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Zeit« verglichen —­ gilt­ als­ das­ Hauptwerk des­ britischen Schriftstellers Anthony Powell und gehört zu den bedeutendsten Romanwerken des 20. Jahrhunderts. Inspiriert von ­dem ­gleichnamigen Bild des französischen Barockmalers Nicolas Poussin, zeichnet der Zyklus ein facettenreiches Bild der englischen Upperclass vom Ende des Ersten Weltkriegs bis in die späten sechziger Jahre. Aus der Perspektive des mit typisch britischem Humor und Understatement ausgestatteten Ich­-Erzählers Jenkins — der durch so­ manche­ biografische­ Parallele­ wie­ Powells­ Alter ­Ego­ anmutet — bietet der »Tanz« eine Fülle von Figuren, Ereignissen, Beobachtungen und Erinnerungen, die einen einzigartigen und auf­schlussreichen Einblick geben in die Gedanken­welt der in England nach wie vor tonangebenden Gesellschaftsschicht mit ihren durchaus merkwürdigen Lebensgewohnheiten.
Im achten Band bilden die letzten Jahre des Zweiten Weltkriegs den historischen Hintergrund.
O, How the Wheel Becomes It!, Bei Lady Molly, Casanova's Chinese Restaurant, The Acceptance World, The Kindly Ones, A Buyer's Market, Venusberg, The Military Philosophers, At Lady Molly's, Temporary Kings, From a View to a Death, The Valley of Bones, A Question of Upbringing, Die Wohlwollenden, Afternoon Men, Das Tal der Gebeine, Hearing Secret Harmonies, Die Welt des Wechsels, Tendenz: steigend, Eine Frage der Erziehung, Agents and Patients, Casanovas chinesisches Restaurant, The Soldier's Art, What's Become of Waring, The Fisher King, Books Do Furnish a Room, Die Kunst des Soldaten, How to turn your pain into power